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Archive for the ‘Elizabeth Brooke’ Category

Last week an Irish Facebook friend and Tudor enthusiast suggested we put more art on Facebook. He asked me to post something about Hans Holbein. I began with Holbein’s famous painting of Henry VIII, but couldn’t resist – I had to share family members painted by the great man.

I’ve noticed some of the people who sat for Holbein seemed somewhat awkward about or uncomfortable with the situation. I am most haunted by our Sir Henry Wyatt.

Sir Henry Wyatt Knight

Sir Henry Wyatt Knight

His painting is oil on oak, only 15.4″ x 12.2.” According to Wikipedia, which does a nice job of documenting the art they share with us, it’s in the Louvre Museum, on the second floor, room 8.

This is the face that endured the application of horse barnacles during torture ordered by Richard III. He was only 23 when imprisoned and locked away until the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. He lived with that face for a long time.

“In the Louvre picture Sir Henry is represented at half-length, slightly turned to the right, wearing a black skull-cap over his long hair, and the customary overcoat with deep fur collar, and green under-sleeves ; from his shoulders hangs a large heavy gold chain, to which a gold cross is attached, which he grasps with his right hand, and holds a folded paper in his left. He is clean-shaven, and has a large rounded nose. The wrinkled face, the small tremulous mouth, and the tired eyes with the sadness of their expression, produce a very life-like effect of old age. The chain is put on with real gold, in a way which Holbein practised from time to time in England.” Hans Holbein the Younger: Volume 1 by Arthur Bensley Chamberlain

Susan Foister, author of Holbein in England, ISBN 1854376454 wrote “the sitter appears to have lost his teeth.”

Experts think it was painted around 1537 – around the same time as his son’s portrait and very near the time of his death. Sir Henry was born in 1460, died at 76 or 77 on 10 November, 1537.

Sir Thomas Wyatt the Poet …

STWLargebyHolbein

He would have been around 34 in 1537. Wikipedia tells us this is “Black and coloured chalks, pen and ink on pink-primed paper, 37.3 × 27.2 cm, Royal Collection, Windsor Castle.” One of my books (Holbein by Jane Roberts) says it was “Black and coloured chalks and ink applied with pen and brush on pink prepared paper 37.1 x 27 cm.” We’re told Holbein also drew a profile portrait.

According to Holbein’s Drawings at Windsor Castle by Phaidon, “On a pale pink priming, 14 11/16 x 10 11/16”: chalks: black, red (face, patch at shoulder on left, another on chest), brown (beard); reinforced with the pen in indian ink (hair, beard). Eyes: grey-blue. Inscribed (gold and scarlet) in left upper corner Tho: Wiatt Knight. The face is considerably stained.”

Phaidon also mentions “Another portrait of Wyatt by Holbein is also lost. From it derive the small circular woodcut which appeared in Leland’s Naeniae in mortem ?Thomae Viati, 1542, and two circular paintings, in reverse to the woodcut, in the Bodleian Library and National Portrait Gallery.” I think this refers to the following image:

STWOilonPanel
According to Wikipedia: “Portrait of Sir Thomas Wyatt. Oil on panel, 31.7 cm diameter, National Portrait Gallery, London. This oil portrait of Wyatt in a medallic profile composition derives from a lost drawing or painting by Hans Holbein the Younger of about 1540. Holbein’s woodcut for Leland’s Naenia presumably follows the original version. Four 16th-century copies by other hands survive, of which this is one of two at the National Portrait Gallery”

So then, what’s this? Wikipedia says “A high-quality copy of this drawing by another hand survives, perhaps from the Elizabethan period (K. T. Parker, The Drawings of Hans Holbein at Windsor Castle, Oxford: Phaidon, 1945.” (I don’t like it.)

Sir Thomas Wyatt by Holbein
Sir Thomas Wyatt was born in 1503 at Allington Castle; he died at a friend’s house, age 38 or 39, on 11 October, 1542.

This is Margaret Wyatt, Lady Lee – Sir Henry’s only daughter, Sir Thomas’ sister, dear friend of Anne Boleyn. Apparently Margaret was also known as Mary, so Wikipedia is confused about “which sister” was Anne’s loyal Lady in Waiting. She looks so different from her father and brother, I wonder if she took after her mother – Anne Skinner.

Lady Margaret Lee Large
Wikipedia dates it at about 1540, tempera on panel, 16.7 × 12.9″ – currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Margaret was the mother of Sir Henry Lee, Queen Elizabeth’s champion. (Check it out; I swear I can see some Wyatt in his painting. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Henry_Lee)

Some think this Holbein may be Elizabeth Brooke, wife of Sir Thomas Wyatt the Poet.

ElizabethbBrooke

According to Holbein’s Drawings at Windsor Castle by Phaidon, “The inscription is certainly incorrect, the features showing no resemblance whatever with the well authenticated drawing of Anne Boleyn in Lord Bradford’s possession… It is possible that there is indirect evidence of the sitter’s identity in the occurrence of various heraldic sketches on the reverse of the drawing, these being the coat-of-arms of the Wyatt family.”

Her brother was George Brooke, 9th Baron of Cobham. Do we see a resemblance? I think so, but it’s hard to say.

GeorgeBrooke9thBaronCobham

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s brother-in-law took part in the trail of Anne Boleyn and got caught up in his son’s rebellion against Queen Mary.

Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger was born in 1521. He was about 15 or 16 when his grandfather died, 20 or 21 when his father died. He was one of the leaders of the rebellion opposing Queen Mary’s desire to marry Philip of Spain. Henry’s grandson was executed at 32 or 33 at Tower Hill on 11 April 1554.

This is a Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger by Holbein. Wikipedia says “Oil on circular panel: Diameter 12 5/8 in. (32 cm.) Painted circa 1540-42.”

STWtheYoungerLargebyHolbein

“Provenance: Presumably commissioned by sitter’s father Sir Thomas Wyatt Senior (1503 – 1542), Thence likely by descent to sitter and dispersed with his property after his execution in 1554; With J. Tremlett Esq. by whom sold; Christie’s, 22 November 1974, lot 152”

Other close friends of Sir Thomas Wyatt the Poet were painted by Holbein, but let us not end this post without adding the Wyatt family’s powerful friend Thomas Cromwell.

Cromwell,Thomas
Painted between 1532 and 1533, oil on oak panel, 30.9 × 25.4″.

According to Wikipedia, “Three early versions of this painting survive: this one, in the Frick Collection, New York; one in the National Portrait Gallery, London (see ‘other versions’ below); and one at Burton Constable, Yorkshire, England. Art scholar Roy Strong believed that all three were copies and, while the condition of all three is poor, that the Frick version is in the best condition. Art scholar John Rowlands, however, has since deduced from pentimenti (signs of alteration) revealed by X-ray photographs that the Frick version shows the hand of Holbein himself and is the original. He is followed in this attribution by art scholar Stephanie Buck. All three versions had scrolls painted above Cromwell’s head, but the scroll on the Frick version, which was painted after Cromwell’s execution, was removed during restoration. The painting has been over-restored, resulting in the removal of much of the surface subtlety characteristic of Holbein.”

Please join us on Facebook, where I regularly post articles of interest:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sir-Thomas-Wyatt-the-Poet/287394704652301

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Our Aunt

Our Aunt

Alison Weir – my hero – made an error in her book Henry VIII; it’s on page 398, re: Sir Thomas Wyatt the Poet. She wrote “In 1537, his marriage to Elizabeth Brooke was finally dissolved, and he married Jane Haute, a distant connection of the King’s grandmother, Elizabeth Wydeville, queen of Edward IV. Despite his aversion for court life, Wyatt now made a career of diplomacy …”

She got her Wyatts crossed. It’s easy to do.

Sir Tom’s love to the end was Elizabeth Darrell, one of Katherine of Aragon’s most faithful ladies. They openly lived together. So far as I know, Thomas and Elizabeth Brooke never got their divorce; she remarried after his death. And we all know his son married Jane Haute.

There was a bright spot in the disappointment – I didn’t know about the Haute/Wydeville connection. I threw myself into ancestry.com and hope you’re as excited as I am to learn more about this branch of our tree. If memory serves, Edward IV made a somewhat violent pass at (our Aunt) Elizabeth and she resisted. Of course he was smitten by any beautiful woman with morals, so he married her. He was a fun, earthy king – someone we might enjoy having a beer with. He remembered names and treated commoners with uncommon friendliness.

When he died our “Aunt” Elizabeth York scrambled to protect her children from the forces that hoped to seize his throne. Our cousins – the princes in the tower – were probably smothered in their bed by Richard III’s men. (It amazes me that the history that affects me most deeply always winds up involving actual ancestors.)

Henry Tudor’s brilliant mother Margaret Beaufort plotted a match between Elizabeth’s daughter and her son; Richard III was vanquished, the marriage took place and our Haute line joined the Tudor line to Henry VIII himself. Worst cousin EVER.

Imagine what this means to our relation to Queen Elizabeth. Since we’re related to Anne Boleyn through Elizabeth Brooke, we’re related to her mother and her father.

The generational distance shown here is mine and I’m a baby boomer. If you are too, the distance should be fairly close. Add, subtract, or hit ancestry.com to work it out on your own.

(Note that part of this line might be incorrect – see the comment about Joan Woodville below; this warrants further investigation when I have time. )  

OUR HAUTE – WYDEVILLE – WYATT CONNECTION

Lady Joan Wydville/Woodville (1410 – 1462)
(Sister of Queen Elizabeth, Wife of Edward IV)
is our 16th great grandmother

William Haute or Hawte (1430 – 1497)

Son of Lady Joan

Thomas Hawte (1453 – 1502)

Son of William

Hawte, Sir William Knight (1490 – 1530)

Son of Thomas

Jane, Lady Hawte (Haute) (1522 – 1600)

Daughter of Hawte, Sir William Knight

George (Sir) Wyatt (1550 – 1625)

Son of Jane, Lady

Reverend Haute Wyatt (1594 – 1638)

Son of George (Sir)


Elizabeth Wydeville “Queen Consort of England” Wife of Edward IV (1437 – 1492)
Mother of the Princes in the Tower

is our 16th great grand aunt

Sir Richard I DeWydeville/Woodville Constable of the Tower (1385 – 1441)

Father of Elizabeth

Lady Joan Wydville/Woodville (1410 – 1462)

Daughter of Sir Richard I

William Haute or Hawte (1430 – 1497)

Son of Lady Joan

Thomas Hawte (1453 – 1502)

Son of William

Hawte, Sir William Knight (1490 – 1530)

Son of Thomas

Jane, Lady Hawte (Haute) (1522 – 1600)

Daughter of Hawte, Sir William Knight

George (Sir) Wyatt (1550 – 1625)

Son of Jane, Lady

Reverend Haute Wyatt (1594 – 1638)

Son of George (Sir)

Elizabeth York Plantagenet (Queen of England, Wife of Henry VII) (1466 – 1503)

is our 1st cousin 17x removed

Elizabeth Wydeville “Queen Consort of England” (1437 – 1492)

Mother of Elizabeth York

Sir Richard I DeWydeville/Woodville Constable of the Tower (1385 – 1441)

Father of Elizabeth

Lady Joan Wydville/Woodville (1410 – 1462)

Daughter of Sir Richard I

William Haute or Hawte (1430 – 1497)

Son of Lady Joan

Thomas Hawte (1453 – 1502)

Son of William

Hawte, Sir William Knight (1490 – 1530)

Son of Thomas

Jane, Lady Hawte (Haute) (1522 – 1600)

Daughter of Hawte, Sir William Knight

George (Sir) Wyatt (1550 – 1625)

Son of Jane, Lady

Reverend Haute Wyatt (1594 – 1638)

Son of George (Sir)


Henry VIII Tudor
(1491 – 1547)

is our 2nd cousin 16x removed

Elizabeth York Plantagenet (Queen Of England) (1466 – 1503)

Mother of Henry VIII

Elizabeth Wydeville “Queen Consort of England” (1437 – 1492)

Mother of Elizabeth York

Sir Richard I DeWydeville/Woodville Constable of the Tower (1385 – 1441)

Father of Elizabeth

Lady Joan Wydville/Woodville (1410 – 1462)

Daughter of Sir Richard I

William Haute or Hawte (1430 – 1497)

Son of Lady Joan

Thomas Hawte (1453 – 1502)

Son of William

Hawte, Sir William Knight (1490 – 1530)

Son of Thomas

Jane, Lady Hawte (Haute) (1522 – 1600)

Daughter of Hawte, Sir William Knight

George (Sir) Wyatt (1550 – 1625)

Son of Jane, Lady

Reverend Haute Wyatt (1594 – 1638)

Son of George (Sir)

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My friend Dr Linda Saether is an expert on Anne Boleyn. She’s so passionate about Anne’s life that she recently went to the Vatican to see Henry VIII’s love letters. She wanted to see them and hold them in her hands.

You can imagine the hoops she went through. She shares her experience here.

http://www.theanneboleynfiles.com/17571/the-vatican-love-letters-of-henry-viii-linda-holds-them/

Why do we care? Anne Boleyn was Sir Thomas Wyatt’s childhood friend and romantic obsession before she caught the king’s eye.

I’ve always wondered how Sir Tom’s wife felt about all this. Anne Boleyn was Lady Elizabeth Brooke’s second (?) cousin.

Pretty cool to be distant relatives of this famous/infamous queen, eh?

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Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard, Third Duke of Norfolk by Hans Holbein the Younger

I’ve been researching our connections with other great families to see where paths, activities and relationships crossed in time.

Elizabeth Brooke, wife of Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder and our great grandmother (many times over), descended from:

• The Boleyns via her maternal grandmother, Lady Elizabeth Boleyn, daughter of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn, Lord Mayor of London.
• The powerful Howards through her paternal great grandmother; her grandmother Margaret deNeville was the daughter of Lady Katherine Howard, sister of the first Duke of Norfolk.

Result: We are related to the Duke of Norfolk and two of Henry’s wives – Anne Boleyn, second wife, as well as Catherine Howard, fifth wife, “the rose without a thorn.”

Here’s a link to the Norfolk family tree; it shows how the Boleyns and Howards are related:

How do the Wyatts fit into this picture???

Sir Tom appears to have loved Anne; and Catherine Howard must have cared for him because she convinced Henry to release him from his second stay at the tower. He wasn’t a relative except through marriage to E. Brooke.

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s godfather was Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk and all-around ruthless guy!

How did the Wyatts, Boleyns and Howards come together as friends BEFORE Sir Tom was born? What was the connection? Hopefully I’ll find out.

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Birthplace of Elizabeth Brooke

Elizabeth Brooke’s birthplace: http://www.cobhamhall.com/historic-house

She was a bit of a phantom; so little information exists.  The Wyatts were friends and neighbors of the Boleyns. Elizabeth was one of their relatives.

Maybe that’s how she and Tom met. We don’t know why she left him after their son was born. They say she lived openly with another man. They also say Henry VIII was considering her as a potential seventh wife as he was reaching the end of his days.

We also know that when Thomas Wyatt and Elizabeth Brooke mixed lines, they gave us benefit of her bloodline. Our ancestors were Vikings, kings and queens.

I got carried away and added descriptions to the ancestors I know by heart. If any of the dates don’t look right, please send me an email; this is really tedious and it’s easy to make mistakes.

When I document how many children they had, remember that few survived in those days.

Our line through Elizabeth Brooke:

Rolf Ragnvaldsson, a.k.a. Rolf the Viking, Rollo the Ganger and Rollo of Norway
Rolf’s own tree includes legendary Vikings. (I worked it up – if anyone’s interested I’ll post it.) Rolf was born circa 846/860. He was among the Viking leaders who laid siege to Paris; instead of paying him off – which was the custom – French King Charles III cut him a deal to protect instead of attack; Rolf became the First Duke of Normandy and was baptized ‘Robert’ in 912. He married Poppa de Valois, granddaughter of Seigneur Pépin (II), Count of Peronne, a great grandson of Charlemagne.  (Rolf had other wives and many more children.) In 927 he gave his son, William (I) Longsword, governance of the dukedom. Rolf is said to have died a pagan in 932.

William I “Longsword”, 2nd Duke of Normandy (893-942)
m Adele of Bretagne (who died after 933).

Richard I “the Fearless”, 3rd Duke of Normandy (933-996)
m Gunnora (about 936 to about 1031)

Richard II, “Richard the Good” – 4th Duke of Normandy
Born 962 in Normandy, France; died 28 Aug 1027 in l’Abbaye de Fecamp.
m Judith of BRITTANY, a.k.a. the Duchess of Rennes (982-1017) in 1000
Have fun with this…
Pedigree resulting from Richard: HM George I’s 18-Great Grandfather, HRE Ferdinand I’s 14-Great Grandfather, U.S. President George Washington’s 21-Great Grandfather, PM Churchill’s 24-Great Grandfather, HM Margrethe II’s 25-Great Grandfather, Agnes Harris’s 20-Great Grandfather, and Osawatomie’ Brown’s 24-Great Grandfather.  See source: http://fabpedigree.com/s068/f017515.htm
Richard II and Judith of Brittany had six children, including …

Robert “the Devil”, 5th Duke of Normandy
Born 999 in Normandy, France. Robert didn’t have any legitimate sons through his wife, so he asked Norman leaders to honor his 7 year old illegitimate son as heir should anything happen to him. Robert died in Nicaea June 22, 1035 while on pilgrimage to Jerusalem.  They kept their word – but it wasn’t easy to keep the boy safe from assassins.
Harlette (Herleva) De Falaise (1003-1050) was Robert’s mistress. They had two children, including William the Bastard – who would earn the title …

William 1 the Conqueror, Norman King

Born 1028, died September 9, 1087.
He won the throne of England in the Battle of Hastings
(After Hastings his men won lands and properties. William’s half-brother – the notoriously not-so-pious Bishop Odo – claimed Allington Castle; many years later it was purchased by our ancestor Sir Henry Wyatt.)
William’s queen was Matilda of Flanders, a direct descendant of Alfred the Great. He was 6’ tall, she was tiny, about 4’ tall. Matilda was born around 1030, died 1083. Both of their tombs were desecrated by people seeking jewels and riches.
The king loved his queen and they had nine children, including…

Henry I Beauclerc, King of England
(Called Beauclerc because he was scholarly)
Born September 1068 and died 1 December 1135.
Henry married Matilda (1079 – 1118), a Scottish princess on November 11, 1100 in Westminster Abbey, London, England.  Her original name was Edith; she changed it to please the Norman barons. She was a descendant of King Edmund II.
Henry I and Matilda had four children, including …

Matilda the Empress Queen
She was born Feb 1102 in London
First she married German Emperor Henry V, who died in 1125.  Then she married Geoffrey V Plantagenet, 9th Count on 22 May 1127 in Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou.  (He was born 24 Aug 1113, died 7 Sep 1151).
Empress Matilda died 9/10/1167 in Notre Dame de Pres.
Matilda and Geoffrey had three children, including …

Henry II Fitzempress, King of England
He was born 25 Mar 1133 in Le Mans, Maine.
Henry married Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess on 18 May 1152 in Bordeaux Cathedral.
Eleanor was born 1122 in Chateau de Belin, Guinne, France.
Henry was crowned King 25 Oct 1154.
Henry died 6 Jul 1189 in The Great Castle of Chinon in Touraine and was buried in Fontevrault Abbey in his native Anjou.
Eleanor died 1 Apr 1204 in Fontevraud Abbey, Maine-et-Loire, France and was buried in Fontevraud Abbey, Maine-et-Loire, France.
Henry and Eleanor had 11 children including …

John Plantagenet, King of England
John was born 24 Dec 1167 in Beaumont Palace near Oxford.
He was crowned King 27 May 1199. John married Isabella of Angoulême Taillefer on 24 Aug 1200 in Angouleme Bordeaux. Isabella of Angoulême Taillefer was born 1180 in Angoulême, France. She died 31 May 1246 in Fontevrault and was buried in Fontevraud Abbey.
John died 18 Oct 1216 in Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire and was buried in Tomb in Worcester Cathedral.
They had five children including …

Henry III, King of England
He was born 12 Oct 1207 in Winchester Castle, Hampshire, England.
Henry was crowned 28 Oct 1216.
Henry III married Eleanor of Provence Berenger on 4 Jan 1236 in Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent.
Eleanor was born 1223 in Aix-en-Provence, France.
Henry died 16 Nov 1272 in Westminster Palace London England and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England.
Eleanor died 24 Jun 1291 in Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire and was buried in Convent Church, Amesbury.
Henry and Eleanor had 9 children including …

Edward I (Longshanks), King of England
He was born was born 17 Jun 1239 in Westminster Palace, London England.
Edward married Eleanor of Castile on 18 Oct 1254 in Abbey of Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile. Eleanor was born 1244 in Castile, Spain.
Edward died 7 Jul 1307 in Burgh-by-Sands and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England. Edward was crowned 1274 in Westminster Abbey.
Eleanor died 24 Nov 1290 in Herdeby, Near Grantham, Lincolnshire and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England.
They had 16 children, including …

Edward II, King of England
He was born 25 Apr 1284 in Caernarvon Castle.
Edward was crowned in 1307, deposed 20 Jan 1327.
He married Isabella of France on 25 Jan 1308 in Boulogne.  Queen Isabella was born in 1292 in Paris.
Edward died 21 Sep 1327 in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire and was buried in Gloucester Cathedral.
She died 22 Aug 1358 in Castle Rising, Norfolk, England and was buried in Grey Friars Church, Newgate, London.
They had five children, including …

Edward 111 King of England
He was born was born 13 Nov 1312 in Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England. Edward was crowned at Westminster Abbey 29 Jan 1327.
Edward married Philippa of Hainault on 24 Jan 1328 in York Minster. She was born 24 Jun 1311 in Valenciennes.
He died 21 Jun 1377 at Sheen Palace Richmond and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England.
Philippa died 15 Aug 1369 in Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England and was buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England.
They had 14 children – some died as infants and one died of the Black Death. One surviving child was …

John of Gaunt, Plantagenet Duke
He was born Mar Mar 1340 in St Bavon’s Abbey, Ghent, Flanders.
He married Constance of Castile for political and dynastic reasons. After she died he married his true love Katherine to legitimize their relationship and their children.
(Katherine’s sister was the wife of Geoffrey Chaucer.John married Catherine Swynford Roet Duchess on 13 Jan 1396 in Lincoln Cathedral. King Richard legitimized their children under English law, but stipulated they were not eligible for royal succession. (That didn’t stop Katherine’s great-great grandson from getting himself crowned Henry VII.)

Between them, John and Katherine started the Tudor and Yorkist Royal Houses; most of the European Royal Houses trace their origins back to them through intermarriage.
Katherine and John fulfilled an ancient prophecy of Merlin: “thou shalt get kings though thou be none!”

Their son John Beaufort (1372 to 1409) had two sons Henry, Earl of Somerset and John, Duke of Somerset who fathered Margaret Beaufort (mother of Henry VII).
Their daughter Joan Beaufort (1379 to 1440) – see below – had as her second husband, Ralph Neville of Derby, 1st Earl of Westmoreland. Joan’s daughter, Cicely, married Richard, Duke of York and was mother to Edward IV and Richard III.

John died 3 Feb 1399 in Ely House Holborn and was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London, England. Catherine died 10 May 1403 in Lincoln and was buried in Lincoln Cathedral.

Joan De Beaufort
Joan was born 1379. She married Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland on 3 Feb 1396. Ralph was born 1363.  Joan died 13 Nov 1440 in Howden, Yorkshire and was buried in Lincoln Cathedral. Ralph died 21 Oct 1425 in Raby Castle, Durham and was buried in Staindrop.

They had 14 children, including …

Sir Edward Neville who was born in 1417. Edward married Catherine Howard on 15 Oct 1448. Catherine Howard was born in 1414, the daughter of Sir Robert Howard of Stoke Neyland and Margaret Mowbray. Her grandparents were John Howard, Sheriff of Essex and Alice Tendring. The Boleyns are also related to the  Howards.

He died 18 Oct 1476. She died after 1478.  They had two daughters, including …

Margaret Neville
Margaret was born about 1455 in Raby, Durham, England; she died 9/30/1506.
She married John Brooke, Lord Cobham. He was born 10 Dec 1447 in Cowling, Kent, England and died March 3, 1511 or 12.
John Brooke and Margaret Neville had one son …

Thomas Brooke, Lord Cobham
He was born about 1465 in Cowling, Kent, England.
Lord Cobham married Dorothy HEYDEN or Haydon about 1494. She was born 1465 in Beaconsthorpe, Norfolk, England. Dorothy was the daughter of Sir Henry Heydon and Ann Boleyn; Anne Boleyn was the daughter of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn.
Thomas died July 1529 in Stringston, Somersetshire, England.
Elizabeth was related to Anne Boleyn on her mother’s side; Sir Geoffrey Boleyn, Lord Mayor of London, was her mother’s grandfather.
Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heyden or Heydon had two children, including …

Elizabeth Brooke
She was born 1503 in Cobham Hall, Kent, England; her well-known brother George was born in 1500. Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Wyatt, the Poet. He was born 1503 in Allington Castle, Boxley, Kent, England; Sir Tom died 1542 on the road while working on behalf of the king. Elizabeth died in 1560.
Elizabeth Brooke and Sir Thomas Wyatt had one son …

Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger.
Born 1520 in Allington Castle, Boxley, Kent, England
Married Jane Hawte in 1537 at Boxley, Kent, England; Jane was born in 1522.
Sir Tom led part of a rebellion, was captured by Queen Mary’s forces and died a traitor’s death 11 APR 1554 in the Tower of London, London.
Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger and Jane Hawte had three children, including …

George Wyatt was born 1550 in Allington Castle, Boxley, Kent, England
m Jane Finch 8 OCT 1582 in Caswell, Kent, England. Jane was born around 1555.
George was first biographer of Anne Boleyn. He died died 16 SEP 1623 in Ireland
George and Jane had three children – Francis Wyatt, Haute/Hawte Wyatt and Isabel Wyatt.

Francis and Haute Wyatt
went to Jamestown shortly before the Indian massacre; they returned to England after their father’s death to settle his estate; Francis wound up going back to Jamestown with Haute’s children and stayed.  (See my previous post on Jamestown.)

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